Film Booking Offices of America

The Film Booking Offices of America , or FBO , was an American production studio during the era of silent film . This company produced most of the time low budget movies. His trade began with Robertson-Cole, the US division of the British import-export company. Robertson-Cole initiated film production in 1920  ; two years later, they reorganized under the name of the FBO. In 1923 , the studio contracted with Western actor Fred Thomson , who will become one of Hollywood’s most popular actors.

The company, headquartered in a small American city, also produced romantic melodramas, action films, and comedy shorts. In 1928 , thanks to the RCA Photophone , the FBO became the second studio to release a feature film. In October 1928, RCA, which had bought FBO in Kennedy announced the merger of FBO and Keith-Albee-Orpheum (KAO) which marks the birth of RKO Pictures .

History of the studio

Creation and identity

The company that will later become FBO begins as an American subsidiary to the British company importing, exporting and distributing films Robertson-Cole Pictures. RC Pictures arrives for the first time on the American market of film distribution and installs its headquarters in New York . In 1919, the company teamed up with Exhibitors Mutual Distributing, from Mutual Film studio . The first feature film produced by RC Pictures is The Wonder Man , directed by John G. Adolfi and with Georges Carpentier , released May 29, 1920. At the time of his debut in production, Robertson-Cole moved into a five-and-a-half-acre studio in the Colegrove district of Los Angeles , then adjacent to, but soon to be included in Hollywood . In January 1921, Robertson-Cole absorbed Hallmark Pictures who acquired Exhibitors Mutual a year earlier. The first official production shot at the new studio was released in February 1921; this is The Mistress of Shenstone by Henry King and Pauline Frederick . The same year, the British rulers of the studio began working with Joseph P. Kennedy , father of the 35 th  President of the United States John F. Kennedy . Joseph Kennedy is then a broker at a New York bank, as well as the owner of Maine-New Hampshire Theaters, a small chain of movie theaters. Although he failed to make the sale that RC’s associates wanted, Kennedy’s involvement in the studio is far from over.

Kennedy takes orders

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Arrival of the sound cinema

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Posterity

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Filmography

  • 1926  : Going the Limit by Chester Withey

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