Major of cinema

In the world of cinema, the majors are the largest American production studios . Their number has varied according to the periods and especially their shareholders. Considered as independent during the Golden Age of the 1920s-1930s, the production companies subsequently changed owners, statuses, disappeared or merged.

History

1900-1927: Beginning of the cinema

At the beginning of American cinema, many producers created their own companies to shoot their films. In 1908 , Thomas Edison founded the Motion Picture Patents Company, nicknamed the Edison Trust , a consortium of companies that had a monopoly on Eastman filmstrips and received royalties for the use of dandruff. Edison’s company had put in place a system of sometimes unannounced control cameras in film studios then mostly settled around New Yorkto verify that the film was not an infringement. Quickly, independent productions not affiliated with the MPPC asked for the dissolution of the trust.

In 1912, the Chicago- based company of Carl Laemmle obtained a judgment in favor of the dissolution of the trust for “illegal and anticompetitive association”. On June 8, 1912, he launched the merger of his production company named Independent Moving Picture Company with other producers, which became Universal Pictures . Universal moved to California in Hollywood with two locations, Nestor Studios and Edendale Studios 1 .

1928-1950: the Golden Age

  1. Loew’s Incorporated
  2. Warner Bros. Pictures
  3. Paramount Pictures
  4. 20th Century Fox Film Corporation
  5. RKO Radio Pictures

1950s and 1960s

  1. Loew’s Incorporated
  2. Warner Bros. Pictures
  3. Paramount Pictures
  4. Columbia
  5. 20th Century Fox Film Corporation
  6. Universal Pictures
  7. RKO Radio Pictures

1970s and 1980s

  1. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
  2. Warner Bros. Pictures
  3. Paramount Pictures
  4. Columbia
  5. 20th Century Fox Film Corporation
  6. Universal Pictures
  7. United Artists
  8. Avco Embassy Pictures

Years 1990 to 2010

  1. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer / United Artists
  2. Warner Bros. Pictures
  3. Paramount Pictures
  4. Columbia TriStar Pictures
  5. 20th Century Fox Film Corporation
  6. Universal Pictures
  7. Walt Disney Pictures
  8. New Line Cinema
  9. DreamWorks Pictures
  10. Miramax Movies
  11. Artisan Entertainment
  12. Lions Gate Films

The majors

In the 1920s and 1930s , although eight major studios shared the majority of productions, the Big Five were nicknamed the Big Five , namely Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer , Paramount Pictures , Twentieth Century Fox , Warner Bros. . Pictures and finally RKO Pictures . The term Little Three majors was sometimes used for the three “middle” studios: United Artists , Columbia Pictures and Universal Pictures .

As opposed to majors, the term ” Poverty Row” was used during the Golden Age to refer to small studios.

The 8 majors of the Golden Age

  1. Columbia
  2. 20th Century Fox Film Corporation
  3. Warner Bros. Pictures
  4. Paramount Pictures
  5. Universal Pictures
  6. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
  7. United Artists
  8. RKO Radio Pictures

The 7 sisters 1980s

  1. Columbia TriStar Pictures – a subsidiary of Sony Pictures Entertainment
  2. Walt Disney Pictures / Touchstone Pictures – subsidiaries of The Walt Disney Company
  3. 20th Century Fox Film Corporation – a subsidiary of 21st Century Fox
  4. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer / United Artists – a subsidiary of MGM Holdings
  5. Paramount Pictures – a subsidiary of Viacom
  6. Universal Studios – a subsidiary of Comcast
  7. Warner Bros. Pictures – a subsidiary of Time Warner

Current Majors

Head quarter Main studio Art and test label Label genre film or series B Animation Studio Other studios or labels Market share USA / Canada(2016)
Walt Disney Studios Entertainment
( Walt Disney Company )
Walt Disney Pictures Disneynature , Lucasfilm , Marvel Studios and 20th Century Fox . DisneyToon Studios , Lucasfilm Animation , Marvel Animation , Pixar Studios Animation , Walt Disney Animation Studios The Muppets Studio , Touchstone Pictures , UTV Motion Pictures 26.09%
Warner Bros. Entertainment
( Time Warner )
Warner Bros. Pictures Warner Bros. Animation Castle Rock , HBO Movies , New Line Cinema , Turner Entertainment 16.86%
Fox Entrainment Group
( 21st Century Fox )
20th Century Fox Fox Searchlight Pictures Fox Faith Blue Sky Studios , 20th Century Fox Animation New Regency Productions (20%) 12.92%
Universal Studios
NBCUniversal
( Comcast )
Universal Pictures Focus Features ,WT 2 Productions Working Title Films Entertainment Illumination , DreamWorks Animation , Universal Animation Studios 12.50%
Sony Picture Motion Picture Group
( Sony )
Columbia Pictures Sony Pictures Classics Screen Gems , Affirm Films , Stage 6 Movies Sony Pictures Animation Sony Pictures
TriStar Pictures 2
TriStar Productions 3 , SPWA 4
8.07%
Paramount Motion Pictures Group
( Viacom )
Paramount Pictures Paramount Vantage Insurge Pictures Paramount Animation MTV Films , Nickelodeon Movies 7.50%

Disney 20.71%; UTV Communications: + .08%; (Prev total: 2015 – 20.7%, 2014 – 14.9%, 2013 – 15.9%, 2012 – 14.7%, 2011-12.2%, 2010-14.3%, 2009-11.9%, 2008-11.4%, 2007-15.3%; 2006-16.7%, 2005-14.6%, 2004-16.5%)

Warner Bros .: 13.9%; New Line: 2.9%  (Prev total: 2015 – 14.0%, 2014 – 14.4%, 2013 – 17.08%, 2012 – 15.3%, 2011-18.1%, 2010-18.0%, 2009-20.1%, 2008-19.4 %; 2007-20.5%; 2006-14.9%; 2005-21.7%; 2004-17.7%)

20th Century Fox: 11.3%; Fox Searchlight: 1.0%  (Prev total: 2015 – 12.7%, 2014 – 16.5%, 2013 – 10.80%, 2012-10.4%, 2011-11.1%, 2010-14.8%, 2009-16.1%, 2008-13.2 %; 2007-11.9%; 2006-17.0%; 2005-16.5%; 2004-11.7%)

Universal: 21.3%; Focus Features: 1.0%  (Prev total: 2015 – 21.6%, 2014 – 10.3%, 2013 – 13.9%, 2012-11.3%, 2011-11.3%, 2010-9.2%, 2009-10.0%, 2008-12.9 %; 2007-12.7%; 2006-10.9%; 2005-13.2%; 2004-10.8%)

Sony (Columbia / Screen Gems / TriStar): 8.4%; Sony Classics: 0.5%  (Prev total: 2015 – 8.5%, 2014 – 11.6%, 2013 – 11.17%, 2012 – 17.0%, 2011-13.4%, 2010-12.8%, 2009-14.2%, 2008-13.4 %; 2007-13.4%; 2006-19.3%; 2005-11.1%; 2004-16.8%)

Paramount: 5.9%  (Prev total: 2015 – 6.2%, 2014 – 9.7%, 2013 – 8.94%, 2012-8.3%, 2011-19.3%, 2010-16.8%, 2009-14.3%, 2008-17.2% 2007-16.1%; 2006-11.0%; 2005-9.8%; 2004-6.8%)

References

  1. ↑ Clive Hirschhorn The Universal Story (1983), London, Crown Publishing ( ISBN  0-517-55001-6 ) . P. 11.
  2. ↑ Divisions  [ archive ] . Sony Pictures Entertainment: SonyPictures.com. Accessed on November 7, 2013.
  3. ↑ Fleming, Mike Jr. ” Tom Rothman To Launch New TriStar Productions Label For Sony  [ archive ] ” Deadline Hollywood(August 1, 2013).
  4. ↑ About  [ archive ] . Sony Pictures Worldwide Acquisitions.com. Accessed on November 7, 2013.

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