D’oh!

Oh!  “Is a recurrent expression of Homer Simpson in the original and Quebec versions of the animated series The Simpsons , also pronounced” T’oh!  In the French version.

Homer uses this onomatopoeia after having committed a blunder or an idiocy, when he is injured or when he is surprised. Other characters may use this phrase, such as Bart , Lisa, or the parents of Homer, Mona, and Abraham .

History

During the voice recording session for a short film of Tracey Ullman’s Show  (in) , Homer would say that the script designated as a “grunt annoyed” ( annoyed grunt ). Dan Castellanetathen played an elongated “ooooooh”, inspired by James Finlayson , an actor appearing in thirty-three films by Laurel and Hardy . Finlayson used this expression as a shortened expletive to replace the word ” Damn!  “. Matt Groening felt it would be better for animation timing that “ooooooh” be said more quickly. Castellaneta thus shortened it to a faster “oh! » 1. The first use of oh! took place in the short film The Krusty the Clown Show , in 1989 1 and this onomatopoeia is used in the series from the first episode, Christmas mortal , broadcast the same year 2 .

In the French version , it’s the phonetic expression T’oh ! which is used, following an error of Philippe Peythieu during the casting of the voice (he could not pronounce the expression with the “d”) 3 , 4 . Unlike his French counterpart, actor Hubert Gagnon , who doubles Homer Simpson in the Quebec version of the series , says “D’oh! “.

In 2001 , “oh! “ Was added to the Oxford English Dictionary , but without the apostrophe:” doh ” 5 . The definition of the word is “expression of frustration when you realize that things went wrong or unexpectedly, or that you did something stupid” ( expressing frustration at the realization that things have turned it is not enough, or that one has just said or done something foolish ) 6 . In 2006, oh! was ranked sixth on TV Land’s ranking of the hundred most recurring expressions of television 7 , 8 .D’oh! is also included in the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations  (in) 9 , as well as other quotes from the Simpsons .

Notes and references

On other Wikimedia projects:

  • D’oh! , on Wikimedia Commons
  • In ) This article is partially or entirely from the article in English entitled ” D’oh!  » ( See the list of authors ) .
  1. ↑ a and b en ) ” What’s the story with … Homer’s D’oh!  ” , The Herald , ( read online  [ archive ] )
  2. ↑ ( in ) Jeremy Simon , ” Wisdom from The Simpsons ” D’oh ‘boy ‘ , The Daily Northwestern , ( read online  [ archive ] )
  3. ↑ lapropagationduchaos.net: Interview with Philippe Peythieu  [ archive ] “For the test, I had to say …:” D’OH! And in fact I did “T’OH” because I could not read the D and it remained “T’OH” in French! “
  4. ↑ simpsonspark.com: Interview with Philippe Peythieu  [ archive ] “I finally got the role on the famous” D’oh! “US which began with a D . Having misunderstood, I thought it was a T which became “T’oh! ” in French. The ‘T’oh! Comes from the test end and has been kept over the years. “
  5. ↑ ( in ) ” It’s in the dictionary, d’oh!  »  [ Archive ] , BBC News, (accessed September 21, 2008 )
  6. ↑ ( in ) ” Oh!” The Right Thing?  ”  [ Archive ] , Newsweek , (accessed September 21, 2008 )
  7. ↑ ( en ) ” Dyn-O-Mite! TV Land Lists catchphrases ”  [ archive ] , USA Today, (accessed September 7, 2008 )
  8. ↑ ( in ) ” The 100 greatest TV quotes and catchphrases ”  [ archive ] , TV Land, (accessed September 7, 2008 )
  9. ↑ ( in ) ” Homer’s Odyssey ”  [ archive ] , Us Weekly, (accessed September 23, 2008 )

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